Fall Black Bean Soup - YUM YUM!

This is a recipe that I end up making entirely too much of and Rob typically bows out after 2-3 days of it. BUT! The option to freeze some for those busy weeks is always there. Another tip is that we sprinkle nutritional yeast on it for a cheesy flavor and...well...nutrition! 

Ingredients

1 small yellow onion, minced
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 celery stalks, chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
2 vegetable stock powder or fresh stock
1 1/2 cups boiling water
2 {15 oz} cans black beans {do NOT drain}
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cumin
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 1/2 tablespoons arrowroot

*I add 1-2 green peppers, chopped

Sometimes I also add carrots if we have extra (which we always do)

Directions

Add half a can of beans, salt and cumin, and puree soup slightly in a blender {I used my Vitamx but it would fit in a Magic Bullet}, then put into the crockpot. Add the rest of the ingredients.

In a small mixing bowl, combine the arrowroot with 1 1/2 tablespoons of water. Add the lemon and the arrowroot mixture to the soup, and cook until thickened.

Put all of this into the crockpot. 8 hours low, 4 hours high. If it thickens or boils too much liquid out then mix up a little more stock and add it to it! 

Serve and enjoy!

Viola! 

*derived from onehundreddollarsamonth

Butternut Squash & Black Bean Enchiladas and the health benefits!

This is an incredibly tasty and easy recipe for a full flavor Mexican dish. By using a plant based protein we cut down on things like cholesterol, fat and excess weight, not to mention it's more sustainable and ethical. Here is the recipe and photos to guide you. Enjoy!

Make sure to read further in the blog about the benefits of these natural whole foods!

Butternut Squash and Black Bean Enchiladas

Servings: 8, size: 1 enchilada

Ingredients

1 cup red enchilada sauce, I made my own and have the recipe below

1 tsp olive oil

2-3 cups peeled butternut squash, cut into small chunks 1/2 inch diameter (to peel use a vegetable peeler and cut off ends then scoop out seeds with spoon)

1 small onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 jalapeno, seeded and diced 

10 oz can of diced tomatoes with green chilies, I realized too late that we only had a can of stewed tomatoes so I used those! 

1 1/2 cups reduced sodium canned black beans, rinsed and drained (1 can approx)

1/2 cup fresh cilantro, diced

1 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp chili powder

1/4 cup water, this may be less or more

8 tortillas of your choice, we use whole grain or chia seed variety

*optional 2 TBS chopped scallions, for garnish

Directions: Preheat oven to 400 degrees, place 1/4 cup sauce onto bottom on large baking dish. 

Heat olive oil over medium-high heat in large skillet, add onions, garlic and jalapeno and cook 2-3 minutes until onions are translucent and garlic is fragrant. Add cubbed squash, tomatoes, beans, cilantro, cumin and chili powder and season with salt and pepper to taste. If there is already plenty of liquid then cover and cook over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until the squash is tender, about 30 to 35 minutes. If more liquid is needed to soften this all up then add more slowly. Remember, the lid being on will create moisture of it's own. It is easier to start out with less and add moisture then to have to turn up the heat to reduce the moisture thus over cooking. 

Lay out one tortilla at a time and fill it with a generous 1/3 cup of the mix in the skillet. Repeat with remaining tortillas and place them all into the baking dish, I used a 9x11 glass dish. Pour over remaining sauce and cover dish with foil and cook for about 10 minutes. 

Serve and enjoy! 

I also free-styled some salsa out of some cherry tomatoes, red onions, garlic, onion salt, garlic powder and cumin for topping. 

Enchilada sauce

3TBS olive oil

1 TBS flour, I used coconut

1/4 cup chili powder

2 cups vegetable stock

10 ounces tomato paste, however I used a small can which was 6 ounces (kind of thought it a waste to open up a second can when I wouldn't be using it all)

1 tsp dried oregano

1 tsp ground cumin

1/4 tsp garlic powder

1/4 tsp onion salt

In medium sauce pan heat oil, add flour, smooth and stir with wooden spoon. Cook for 1 minute. Add chili powder and cook for seconds. Add stock, paste and spices. Stir to combine. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and cook approx. 15 minutes until it is thick and smooth. Adjust seasonings to your liking. 

*Freeze some and save it for later!

Benefits of Black Beans

Black beans were first domesticated thousands of years ago in Peru, and quickly became a staple of the South American diet. They first came to Europe when explorers came home with them in the 1500s.

They are very high in fiber, folate, protein, and antioxidants, along with numerous other vitamins and minerals. Black beans make a complete protein when paired with brown rice, which is often why they are so commonly included in a vegetarian diet.

Digestive Tract Benefits

The high quantity of both protein and fiber in black beans help to move food through the stomach to the large intestine at a healthier pace. This keeps any one part of the digestive tract from having to work too hard and supports the ideal balance of chemicals and populations of microorganisms required for a healthy digestive system.

Blood Sugar Regulation

The steady movement of protein and fiber through the digestive system allows for a measured breakdown of food into its component parts. This even breakdown of food helps to curtail extremes regarding simple sugar uptake from the digestive tract. An excess of simple sugar uptake all at once can produce an unwanted blood sugar spike. A lack of simple sugar uptake may produce a rapid blood sugar drop. Either extreme can upset blood sugar balance. The quantity of fiber and protein in black beans helps avoid both extremes.

Cardiovascular Health

Black beans are abundant in soluble fiber, which is specifically the type of fiber that has been found very helpful in lowering blood cholesterol levels. Lowered risks of coronary heart disease and heart attack have both been associated with increased consumption of soluble fiber, particularly from legumes.

Black beans also contain a wide variety of both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which combat cardiovascular disease. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory protection is particularly important for the cardiovascular system. When blood vessels are exposed to excessive oxidative stress or inflammation, risk for disease development is considerably higher. The prevention of oxidative stress and inflammation lowers risk of acquiring most cardiovascular diseases.

Black beans are also high in folate and magnesium, both nutrients highly associated with preservation of cardiovascular health, and the antioxidant minerals zinc and manganese.

Cancer Prevention

Considering that black beans contain at least 8 different flavonoids with enormous antioxidant potential, and their high content of phytochemicals, it's hardly surprising that studies have connected black bean consumption with reduced risk of certain cancers. Recent studies have suggested considerable effectiveness against colon adenoma, a non-cancerous tumor that can progress into colon cancer.

Nervous System Health

Folate, or vitamin B6, is particularly abundant in black beans. The nervous system relies on folate to produce the amino acids it needs to function. For pregnant women a deficiency in folate can cause the improper development of the fetus's brain and spinal cord. The high iron content of black beans is also particularly beneficial to pregnant women.

Rich in Molybdenum

Black beans are an extremely rich source of the trace mineral molybdenum. Molybdenum serves the useful purpose of breaking down and detoxifying sulfites found in foods like salads and wines. Many people are sensitive to sulfites, and may they cause rapid heartbeat, headache or disorientation when consumed. Studies also suggest that molybdenum deficiencies can result in impotence in older men.

*from healthdiaries.com

Benefits of Butternut Squash

Lowering and preventing high blood pressure

Getting enough potassium in your diet is just as important as lowering your sodium intake when it comes to maintaining a healthy blood pressure.2 According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, fewer than 2% of US adults meet the daily 4,700 mg recommendation.3

Also of note, a high potassium intake is associated with a 20% decreased risk of dying from all causes.3

Preventing asthma

The risks for developing asthma are lower in people who consume a high amount of beta-carotene, the antioxidant that gives certain fruits and vegetables their bright orange pigments. Look for other orange plant foods like papaya, apricots, broccoli, cantaloupe, pumpkin and carrots to increase your beta-carotene intake.6

Lowering cancer risk

Beta-carotene has also been shown to have an inverse association with the development of colon cancer in the Japanese population.4

Among younger men, diets rich in beta-carotene may play a protective role against prostate cancer, according to a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health's Department of Nutrition.5

Managing diabetes

Type 1 diabetics who consume high-fiber diets have lower overall blood sugar levels, while type 2 diabetics have improved blood sugar, lipids and insulin levels. One cup of butternut squash provides about 6.6 grams of fiber out of the recommended 21-25 g/day for women and 30-38 g/day for men.

Healthy looking skin and hair

Butternut squash is also great for your skin because it of its extremely high vitamin A content, which is needed for sebum production that keeps hair moisturized. Vitamin A plays an important role in the growth of all bodily tissues, including skin and hair.

As an added bonus, one serving of butternut squash provides over 50% of the required vitamin C intake for the day, which is needed for the building and maintenance of collagen that provides structure to skin and hair.

Promoting regularity

Maintaining a high fiber diet helps to prevent constipation and promote a healthy digestive tract.

Recent studies have shown that dietary fiber may even decrease inflammation and improve immune function, consequently decreasing the risk of inflammation-related conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Increased fiber intakes have also been shown to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels and enhance weight loss for obese individuals.

Boosting immune function

Plant foods like butternut squash that are high in both vitamin C and beta-carotene offer an immunity boost from their powerful combination of nutrients. Some studies have shown that high-fiber foods may also offer improved immune function.

*from medicalnewstoday.com

Thank you for reading today! Share this and make your own at home! Tag us at #honteslivingathome

Enjoy!