Guest Blog: Frozen Salted Chocolate Peanut Butter Protein Cups

Frozen Salted Chocolate Peanut Butter Protein Cups


Makes 4-6 muffin tin cups (depending on how thick you want them).
25 g protein, 15 g fat
 
Ingredients:
    •    1 scoop chocolate whey or casein protein
    •    1 tsp pure vanilla extract
    •    1 Tbsp. cocoa powder
    •    1 Tbsp. 0% Fage Greek yogurt 
    •    Pinch of salt
    •    Dash of Frank's Red Hot (optional but amazing)
    •    1/2 tablespoon instant decaf coffee granules (optional but amazing)
    •    20-30 stevia drops (more or less depending on how sweet or bitter you like it)
    •    Unsweetened almond or cashew milk
    •    1 tsp virgin coconut oil (adds 5g fat)
    •    1 Tbsp. of natural nut butter (adds 10g fat) 

 
Directions:

Mix all ingredients very well by hand, or whiz it up in the blender, excluding the nut butter, adding milk slowly until reaching brownie batter consistency.  Lightly grease muffin tin pan and empty batter evenly into 4 cups. Divide up the nut butter into however many tins you have, and place a small dollop of peanut butter right in the center of the chocolate batter.  Sprinkle with a pinch of sea salt. (You can also chop up just a couple nuts coarsely and sprinkle that on top as well for texture!)  Freeze for at least 45 min-1 hour.


Find this awesome health coach at her FB page link here! She excels working with athletes as well! 

Butternut Squash & Black Bean Enchiladas and the health benefits!

This is an incredibly tasty and easy recipe for a full flavor Mexican dish. By using a plant based protein we cut down on things like cholesterol, fat and excess weight, not to mention it's more sustainable and ethical. Here is the recipe and photos to guide you. Enjoy!

Make sure to read further in the blog about the benefits of these natural whole foods!

Butternut Squash and Black Bean Enchiladas

Servings: 8, size: 1 enchilada

Ingredients

1 cup red enchilada sauce, I made my own and have the recipe below

1 tsp olive oil

2-3 cups peeled butternut squash, cut into small chunks 1/2 inch diameter (to peel use a vegetable peeler and cut off ends then scoop out seeds with spoon)

1 small onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 jalapeno, seeded and diced 

10 oz can of diced tomatoes with green chilies, I realized too late that we only had a can of stewed tomatoes so I used those! 

1 1/2 cups reduced sodium canned black beans, rinsed and drained (1 can approx)

1/2 cup fresh cilantro, diced

1 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp chili powder

1/4 cup water, this may be less or more

8 tortillas of your choice, we use whole grain or chia seed variety

*optional 2 TBS chopped scallions, for garnish

Directions: Preheat oven to 400 degrees, place 1/4 cup sauce onto bottom on large baking dish. 

Heat olive oil over medium-high heat in large skillet, add onions, garlic and jalapeno and cook 2-3 minutes until onions are translucent and garlic is fragrant. Add cubbed squash, tomatoes, beans, cilantro, cumin and chili powder and season with salt and pepper to taste. If there is already plenty of liquid then cover and cook over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until the squash is tender, about 30 to 35 minutes. If more liquid is needed to soften this all up then add more slowly. Remember, the lid being on will create moisture of it's own. It is easier to start out with less and add moisture then to have to turn up the heat to reduce the moisture thus over cooking. 

Lay out one tortilla at a time and fill it with a generous 1/3 cup of the mix in the skillet. Repeat with remaining tortillas and place them all into the baking dish, I used a 9x11 glass dish. Pour over remaining sauce and cover dish with foil and cook for about 10 minutes. 

Serve and enjoy! 

I also free-styled some salsa out of some cherry tomatoes, red onions, garlic, onion salt, garlic powder and cumin for topping. 

Enchilada sauce

3TBS olive oil

1 TBS flour, I used coconut

1/4 cup chili powder

2 cups vegetable stock

10 ounces tomato paste, however I used a small can which was 6 ounces (kind of thought it a waste to open up a second can when I wouldn't be using it all)

1 tsp dried oregano

1 tsp ground cumin

1/4 tsp garlic powder

1/4 tsp onion salt

In medium sauce pan heat oil, add flour, smooth and stir with wooden spoon. Cook for 1 minute. Add chili powder and cook for seconds. Add stock, paste and spices. Stir to combine. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and cook approx. 15 minutes until it is thick and smooth. Adjust seasonings to your liking. 

*Freeze some and save it for later!

Benefits of Black Beans

Black beans were first domesticated thousands of years ago in Peru, and quickly became a staple of the South American diet. They first came to Europe when explorers came home with them in the 1500s.

They are very high in fiber, folate, protein, and antioxidants, along with numerous other vitamins and minerals. Black beans make a complete protein when paired with brown rice, which is often why they are so commonly included in a vegetarian diet.

Digestive Tract Benefits

The high quantity of both protein and fiber in black beans help to move food through the stomach to the large intestine at a healthier pace. This keeps any one part of the digestive tract from having to work too hard and supports the ideal balance of chemicals and populations of microorganisms required for a healthy digestive system.

Blood Sugar Regulation

The steady movement of protein and fiber through the digestive system allows for a measured breakdown of food into its component parts. This even breakdown of food helps to curtail extremes regarding simple sugar uptake from the digestive tract. An excess of simple sugar uptake all at once can produce an unwanted blood sugar spike. A lack of simple sugar uptake may produce a rapid blood sugar drop. Either extreme can upset blood sugar balance. The quantity of fiber and protein in black beans helps avoid both extremes.

Cardiovascular Health

Black beans are abundant in soluble fiber, which is specifically the type of fiber that has been found very helpful in lowering blood cholesterol levels. Lowered risks of coronary heart disease and heart attack have both been associated with increased consumption of soluble fiber, particularly from legumes.

Black beans also contain a wide variety of both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which combat cardiovascular disease. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory protection is particularly important for the cardiovascular system. When blood vessels are exposed to excessive oxidative stress or inflammation, risk for disease development is considerably higher. The prevention of oxidative stress and inflammation lowers risk of acquiring most cardiovascular diseases.

Black beans are also high in folate and magnesium, both nutrients highly associated with preservation of cardiovascular health, and the antioxidant minerals zinc and manganese.

Cancer Prevention

Considering that black beans contain at least 8 different flavonoids with enormous antioxidant potential, and their high content of phytochemicals, it's hardly surprising that studies have connected black bean consumption with reduced risk of certain cancers. Recent studies have suggested considerable effectiveness against colon adenoma, a non-cancerous tumor that can progress into colon cancer.

Nervous System Health

Folate, or vitamin B6, is particularly abundant in black beans. The nervous system relies on folate to produce the amino acids it needs to function. For pregnant women a deficiency in folate can cause the improper development of the fetus's brain and spinal cord. The high iron content of black beans is also particularly beneficial to pregnant women.

Rich in Molybdenum

Black beans are an extremely rich source of the trace mineral molybdenum. Molybdenum serves the useful purpose of breaking down and detoxifying sulfites found in foods like salads and wines. Many people are sensitive to sulfites, and may they cause rapid heartbeat, headache or disorientation when consumed. Studies also suggest that molybdenum deficiencies can result in impotence in older men.

*from healthdiaries.com

Benefits of Butternut Squash

Lowering and preventing high blood pressure

Getting enough potassium in your diet is just as important as lowering your sodium intake when it comes to maintaining a healthy blood pressure.2 According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, fewer than 2% of US adults meet the daily 4,700 mg recommendation.3

Also of note, a high potassium intake is associated with a 20% decreased risk of dying from all causes.3

Preventing asthma

The risks for developing asthma are lower in people who consume a high amount of beta-carotene, the antioxidant that gives certain fruits and vegetables their bright orange pigments. Look for other orange plant foods like papaya, apricots, broccoli, cantaloupe, pumpkin and carrots to increase your beta-carotene intake.6

Lowering cancer risk

Beta-carotene has also been shown to have an inverse association with the development of colon cancer in the Japanese population.4

Among younger men, diets rich in beta-carotene may play a protective role against prostate cancer, according to a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health's Department of Nutrition.5

Managing diabetes

Type 1 diabetics who consume high-fiber diets have lower overall blood sugar levels, while type 2 diabetics have improved blood sugar, lipids and insulin levels. One cup of butternut squash provides about 6.6 grams of fiber out of the recommended 21-25 g/day for women and 30-38 g/day for men.

Healthy looking skin and hair

Butternut squash is also great for your skin because it of its extremely high vitamin A content, which is needed for sebum production that keeps hair moisturized. Vitamin A plays an important role in the growth of all bodily tissues, including skin and hair.

As an added bonus, one serving of butternut squash provides over 50% of the required vitamin C intake for the day, which is needed for the building and maintenance of collagen that provides structure to skin and hair.

Promoting regularity

Maintaining a high fiber diet helps to prevent constipation and promote a healthy digestive tract.

Recent studies have shown that dietary fiber may even decrease inflammation and improve immune function, consequently decreasing the risk of inflammation-related conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Increased fiber intakes have also been shown to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels and enhance weight loss for obese individuals.

Boosting immune function

Plant foods like butternut squash that are high in both vitamin C and beta-carotene offer an immunity boost from their powerful combination of nutrients. Some studies have shown that high-fiber foods may also offer improved immune function.

*from medicalnewstoday.com

Thank you for reading today! Share this and make your own at home! Tag us at #honteslivingathome

Enjoy!

 

I am Pho real! Quick recipe guide for a home favorite.

Pho! 

10 cups rich vegetable stock
5 limes
2 tablespoons Vietnamese fish sauce, comes in a jar or bottle
2 star anise seeds (optional)
1 package vermicelli, this is a rice noodle I get at the Asian grocery in Cedar Rapids called Saigon Market on 2nd Ave near the new fire station, they are very helpful for any questions you might have
1 1/2 cup bean sprouts, make sure you look for the freshest container, dates should be posted
6 green onions
1/2 bunch cilantro, try growing some in the kitchen!
1 pound local farm raised chicken breast
1 cup basil leaves, grow these at home too
2 jalapenos
OR
4 serrano chilies
Additional fish sauce
Sriracha or other Asian chili sauce

Bring stock to a boil in a large stock pot with the juice of 3 of the limes, fish sauce, and star anise if using. Let stock boil for 15 minutes. 

In a separate pot, bring water to a boil and cook noodles according to package directions. Drain noodles. While noodles are cooking and stock is heating, prep the condiments. Slice green onions on a long diagonal. Roughly chop cilantro. Slice chicken into as thin a slice as possible with a very sharp knife. Rinse basil, dry, and put on platter for service. Slice remaining limes and arrange next to basil on serving platter. Thinly slice chilies and arrange on serving platter. 

 

 

Place platter on table with fish sauce and chili sauce. Serve noodles into bowls. On top of noodles, divide evenly the bean sprouts, sliced green onions and cilantro. Top herbs with chicken. Remove star anise from stock. Ladle hot stock over each bowl of noodles and chicken. This should cook the chicken due to the temperature and the thin slices. If you prefer cooking before this step you can put it into it's own pot of bowling water then add to this bowl with noodles. Serve immediately. 

 

Allow each person to season bowl to taste with additional lime juice, basil, sliced chilies, fish sauce and chili sauce. 

Crockpot Tikka Masala, YUM!

Slow Cooker Tikka Masala

The benefits of spices and convenience of a crockpot make this recipe a winter win!

Total Time:8 hrs 15 minutes

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 8 hours

Servings: 6 Ingredients

  • ●  5 boneless skinless chicken breast halves, cut into 1 inch pieces (about 3 lbs) (there are options via Iowa Valley Food Coop

  • ●  1/2 large yellow onion, finely diced

  • ●  4 garlic cloves, minced

  • ●  2 tablespoons freshly grated ginger

  • ●  1 jalapeño, stemmed, sliced in half and seeds removed

  • ●  1 (29 ounce) can tomato puree (I used my own canned stewed tomatoes and blended them)

  • ●  1 1/2 cups plain yogurt (I opted for a goats yogurt, make sure it's low sugar)

  • ●  2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • ●  2 tablespoons lemon juice

  • ●  2 tablespoons garam masala

  • ●  1 tablespoon cumin

  • ●  1/2 tablespoon paprika

  • ●  2 teaspoons salt (to taste)

  • ●  3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

  • ●  3/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

  • ●  1 ­3 teaspoon cayenne pepper

  • ●  2 bay leaves

  • ●  1 cup heavy cream (I opted for half coconut half almond milk)

  • ●  1/2 tablespoon cornstarch (I used arrowroot)

  • ●  long grain white rice or basmati rice, cooked

  • ●  chopped cilantro, for serving 

tikka 2.jpeg

Something that I didn't do that I would highly suggest is steaming some vegetables for a side dish and pouring some of the sauce over them and eating it with this. There is also always the option to throw the vegetables into the crockpot but I didn't want to throw off the liquid in the crockpot if the vegetables gave out excess liquid. 

Directions

In a large mixing bowl combine chopped onions, minced garlic, grated ginger, sliced jalapeño, tomato puree, plain yogurt, olive oil, lemon juice, Garam Masala, cumin, paprika, salt, cinnamon, pepper and cayenne pepper. Stir until combine.

Pour half of sauce mixture into a large slow cooker then add in diced chicken followed then cover chicken with remaining sauce. Add in 2 bay leaves.

Cover slow cooker with lid and cook on low heat for 8 hours (or high for 4 hours).

In a mixing bowl, whisk together milk and arrowroot, pour mixture into slow cooker and gently stir. Allow mixture to cook 20 minutes while you prepare the rice.

Remove bay leaves and sliced jalapeño and serve warm over rice and sprinkle with chopped cilantro. 

Check out and share some of the other recipes from previous posts! Serve up some delicious meals this winter!

Spiced Pineapple Coleslaw Tacos

His and Hers Healthy Spiced Pineapple Tacos

Mix your meal up to accommodate a romaine lettuce wrap or a healthy minimal ingredient wrap. 

Prep 10 minutes, bake fish 10 minutes, 6 tacos

2 cups coleslaw mix, preshredded 

1 cup fresh pineapple pieces

half a red bell pepper, chopped 

1 green onion, sliced

3 TBS plain goats yogurt or Greek yogurt, watch the sugar content

1/4 tsp salt

2 1/4 Sriracha Hot Chili Sauce, HyVee health section has a "clean" one

2 TBS chili powder, I do a bulk orders for Frontier, message me to put in an order

1 small lemon, will be cut into 8th to spritz onto meal

*Protein options- 2 pieces of fish or a pound of ground turkey or about 2 cups shredded turkey meat

1- Cook turkey or fish in the oven with chili powder sprinkled on top. Or pan cook the ground turkey with chili powder. Use olive oil for baking, and coconut oil for skillet. If using tortilla shells then warm them in the skillet. 

2- Make the slaw by chopping up the pineapple, add slaw, red pepper, onion, yogurt (I added a little extra), salt, Sriracha and then set it in the fridge. 

3- Select lettuce piece or tortilla and spread the slaw and then place the meat on top and wrap it up! VERY delicious and plenty of left overs in my house! 

*inspired by HyVee 

Healthy protein list!

Protein can come from a number of sources....but so can things like high cholesterol and excess weight. Where can you get the protein but not the negative side effects? 

In this short blog post I have simply listed the comparison of 100 grams of a wide variety of items. It is very easy and less expensive to get protein from natural and unprocessed sources! 

 

Natural Sources

Eggs (1 medium or 100g)                 13 grams

Fish (cod fillets 100g or 3.5 ounces)         21 grams

Chicken, roasted (100g or 3.5 ounces)        25 grams

Turkey, roasted (100g)                    29 grams

Peanuts (100g)                        26 grams

Quinoa (100g)                        14 grams

Amaranth (100 grams)                    14 grams

Tofu (100g)                            8 grams 

Chia Seeds (100g)                    17 grams

Hemp Seeds (100g)                    36 grams

Flax Seeds (100g)                    18 grams

Almonds (100g)                        21 grams

Oatmeal (100g)                        2.4 grams

Lentils (100g)                        9 grams

Black Beans (100g)                    22 grams

Kidney Beans (100g)                    9 grams

Chickpeas (100g)                    19 grams

Pinto Beans (100g)                    21 grams

Lima Beans (100g)                    8 grams

Tempeh (100g)                        19 grams

Soybeans (100g)                        36 grams

The controversial Seitan (100g)                    75 grams

Processed sources

Sausages (100g or 3.5 ounces)                12 grams

Hamburger (100 g)                        17 grams

Luncheon Meat (100g or 3.5 ounces)                    13 grams (average)

Ham (100g or 3.5 ounces)                     21 grams